Side Trip: YHWH ‘s Promise to Däwid

I went down this side trip rather late in my journey. I wouldn’t say I found anything earth-shattering on this side trip. But, being a romantic and knowing that YHWH @Élöhîm is a romantic too, it was just something I had wondered about. So, I chased the story down.

How YHWH @Élöhîm (LORD God) Kept His Promise to Däwid

Grace and peace to you,

Dori

My Journey: Solving a Logic Puzzle

Well, that was fun, figuring out how old Yaøáqöv was when he fell in love with Rächël based on the time clues given in Scripture. But what next? I still wasn’t thinking of this in terms of building an internal chronology of the Bible but that’s what I’d started doing in charting events by life years.

I don’t remember any longer why I kept charting life years. I guess I just got interested in it. I’ve always been interested in story chronologies, like Tolkien’s “Tale of Years” in The Lord of the Rings appendices. I grew up reading fantasy/sci fi novels and discovered many of the multi-volume series had inconsistant chronologies. I actually did chronology charts for some of them because I had picked up on the inconsistancies while reading the stories and wanted to know exactly what was what. Looking back now, I can see Rûãch @Élöhîm was training me to do a chronology of His Story:  only His Story is a true story.

So, what did I have with the charts I’d done to answer my first question? Combining them into one table took me to the death of Yôsëph at 110 years old, which was the 285th year since @Avrähäm entered Kenaøan. Okay. Did Scripture give life years for any of Yaøáqöv’s other sons?  It turns out that it does. Exodus 6:16-20 has a short geneaology of Lëwî’s line.

Click here to read the story of finding out how old Yaøáqöv was when Lëwî was born.

Grace and peace to you,

Dori

My Journey: The First Question

Through finding the answer to this first question, Rûãch @Élöhîm led me to compile the Internal Chronology of the Bible and everything else that followed in my pursuit of the truth of His Story and my appreciation of His artistry as an expression of who He is.

The First Question

In reading the story of Yaøáqöv and Rächël in Genesis, I saw a story of love at first sight, at least on Yaøáqöv’s part. And I wondered, “How old was Yaøáqöv when he fell in love with Rächël?”

Follow this link to the story of how I found the answer to the first question.

Grace and peace to you,

Dori

Musings on Side Trips

While my main journey focused on developing an Internal Chronology of the Bible, I took a lot of side trips along the way in seeking the answers to questions that came up. Some of these side trips related to the ICB and others did not.  Sometimes these side trips were simply research, but usually they involved my thinking about what I read or heard and reaching my own conclusions.

Since I found my side trips just as interesting as my main journey, I’m going to write them up and post them as Side Trips.

May the grace and peace of the God and Father of my Lord Jesus Christ be with you.

Dori

Musings on Scholarship

YHWH @Élöhîm did not call me as a mainstream scholar but rather as a non-mainstream scholar. I doubt anything I write will be published in a peer-reviewed journal because I did not go through the prescribed track to obtain the credentials of a doctorate or master’s degree in any specialty field.

My Master’s is in Library Science, which honed my research and organizational skills but did not include a concentration on any given academic subject. My primary interests have always been history and drama, but that includes the history of just about anything and the drama of storytelling in any format. I am more of a generalist than a specialist, more of a researcher than a professor.

Rûãch @Élöhîm did not lead me to mainstream scholarship (outside of the International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Encyclopedia Judaica, and translation materials) until a couple of years ago. Before that, He led me to non-mainstream scholars and other researchers not even claiming to be scholars, such as Dr. E.L. Martin, Dr. A.C. Custance, and—dare I say it?—Ron Wyatt.  The one mainstream scholar Rûãch @Élöhîm led me to was Dr. David R. Rohl, but I do not get the impression that mainstream Egyptologists accept much of his work.

Rûãch @Élöhîm did lead me to the Second Temple Period writers and writings, such as Josephus, Eusebius, Maccabees, The Book of Jubilees, etc. However, after reading The Book of Jasher (the one floating around on the Internet), I concluded it was NOT The Book of Jasher cited in Scripture. I think it is a work of historical fiction written no earlier than the Renaissance and probably later; it did not show up until the 1600s. The Book of Enoch did not have much bearing on my particular studies.

But mostly Rûãch @Élöhîm had me study the details of the Biblical text in depth to see what was there, regardless of the traditions, records, and doctrines of men. Now, 20 years into it, He’s leading me to see what the cultural context was of His written Word and more of what mainstream scholarship has to say. It’s all very interesting.

May the grace and peace of the God and Father of my Lord Jesus Christ be with you.

Dori